Live Each Day As If It’s Your Last

Even towards every allusion I’ve been in love with
’cause the heart that portrays itself willingly
Is like a nation that trades freedom for stability
Its so seductive to be cold and corrupted and isolated and try to be an independent republic
But liberty to be loved on the surface is worthless
The sacrifice of revolution with no purpose ~Immortal Technique~

If we live everyday as if it’s our last, one day we’ll most certainly be right.

We live in a paradoxical world obsessed with immortality and the “future of our world,” yet we spend the evenings in bars and clubs, getting drunk screaming phrases like “YOLO” or “live for today.” How often do we wake up in the morning, moaning and groaning, dreading the day ahead? How often do we go to sleep at night thinking about how exhausted we are?

Many of us are lucky enough to climb into bed at night, in the comfort of our blankets, believing with almost 100% certainty that we will wake up the next day and continue with our (sometimes mundane) lives, but what if we don’t? What if we don’t wake up the next day, or what if we don’t make it home the next night?

We all have this life which has been handed to us, and far too often people take advantage of it. Just because not all of us have been in life-or-death situations and haven’t had the need to fight for our lives doesn’t mean that we can take it for granted. If we let ourselves become apathetic to the fact that one day, we’re all going to die, then we’re a letdown to everyone who’s ever cared about us, ever loved us, or ever needed us. More importantly, we’re a letdown to ourselves.

Everyday is a fight – whether it’s staring down the barrel of a loaded gun or just trying to get through the streets without being robbed; whether it’s going to work because you love it or simply because you need the money for food and rent. But if we just give up and retractthen our life here on earth would be meaningless because it was simply handed to us, and we never fought for it.

It’s human nature to want to survive, which means fight or flight.

But do we define survival as sheer existence or do we actually want to live? Are we here because we have no choice, and have been taught that it is our human obligation and right to remain alive? Or are we here because we actually want to seize the one and only shot we have at making a difference?

Which breeds the question of how one defines “making a difference.” Some view the “difference” or change as a macro-scale impact, whereby taking down and breaking the entire system as we know it; other see the “difference” in simply sharing thoughts and ideologies. Others, yet, see the “difference” as being there for people in times of need, and hoping that perhaps one day, maybe those people will pay it forward.

When someone sounds optimistic and hopeful, they are deemed idealists; yet, how is optimistic idealism any different to cynical revolutionism when the ultimate outcome is the same: to eradicate corruption of the human world? It is what it is, and though macro-scale change is seemingly impossible, micro-scale change isn’t, and that’s where our choices can make the biggest difference.

Is it all about us, or is it all about them?

– live each day as if it’s your last
– treat everyone around you as if it’s their last day
– wake up in the morning without hesitation
– go to sleep at night without regrets

and most importantly: make sure the people you love know how you feel about them, because the day you stop caring might be your biggest regret.

To live is the rarest thing in the world, most people simply exist. ~Wilde~

Gordan.

The Re-establishment of “Today”

Fascinating as it may be that in just less than 2 decades ago, the world was still a chess board of assets, in which nations were no more than pieces of a game shuffled and juggled to the advantage of Greater Powers. Suppose the world were to regress into this mentality, Hong Kong is presumably one of the safest cities to reside in.

Noticeably, many post modernists have taken for granted the stability and safety of what the international society now has to offer. Despite the humanitarian fights for civil and human rights, the world is stable enough on the whole. Arguments can be made that terrorism, global warming and extreme poverty still pose a heavy threat, however on a holistic scale, these issues are inevitable and not state-avoidable. One cannot pin-point the obvious and inescapable in hopes of diverging attention away from what has already been created.

The world is more or less stable: terrorism is not an issue of the past, but without evocation, there is no need for fear in this area.

As for global warming, despite the fear and warnings against a green-house warming, there is no immediate threat posed on society. Scientists have also rejected their claims as being completely and utterly flawless, as the estimation for more than one major factor was proved incorrect at the beginning of this year.

Extreme poverty has been an ongoing issue resulting from decolonization and post-Cold War refuge. Despite the Big Three gathering to discuss post-war life in the last century, it would take much more than a combined global effort to combat the economic damage and political instability sprouted from a previous world of chaos and power politics.

As life continues to progress in the city of Hong Kong, all issues which are being fought for by humanitarian interventions seem abstract and elusive. There is no concrete idea as to how the world may possibly be outside the walls of this city, and even with the amount of international exposure via means of technological communication, everything abstract will remain as such, unless ones’ fortune is ripped entirely from his possession.

Thus, one cannot know what he has until it is taken; and one does not know what he lacks until he experiences it.

Suppose the world were to break into another stone-cold deadly war, post-war life in this new millennium will only result in re-establishing what is today rather than basic survival.

As humans advance, so do our desires to maintain this type of lifestyle.

Mikaela G.

I need to be bold
Need to jump in the cold waters
Need to grow older with a girl like you.

~Joshua Radin~

The Great Firewall of China

Stop calling, stop calling
I don’t wanna think anymore.
~Lady Gaga~

In the rise of national interest, advocacy for human rights seem to be declining. Despite Amnesty International, UNICEF and other major World Peace / Freedom fighters, more and more are focused on the growing demand for the national interested of already developed (OECD) states.

Not only are the democrats demanding Obama’s desires and goals to be fulfilled, but in rejecting the Republicans’ (GOP – Grand Old Party) efforts in bettering the state, one can only wonder what is the the real reason for the underlying tension between parties. Since both parties have similar views — the only obstacle hindering the US from progressing is the label “Republicans” vs. “Democrats.” Suppose one were to remove the titles, and simply come forth with different proposals, it would become evident that the country is merely holding grudges within its own national parties rather than focusing on the betterment of the country and global enterprise.

This said, here are a few updates in sum.

  • China’s increased efforts in silencing its citizens voices has proved harder than envisioned: despite Google’s recent threat to pull out, China has continued building up its firewall to the point where most of its citizens have no idea what they’re missing out on. (Newsweek: Europe. March 2010 edition).
  • Obama’s Health-Care Plan has reached a total of 1,990 pages and has increased to US$950 Billion. This is not only causing disputes amongst most of Congress (who are still weary of this proposal) but medical students fresh into their career are making an average of US$100,000 annually, as opposed to their US$200,000 med school debts which they are left with. This explains why most med students choose to go into private practices and dermatology rather than work for the public systems. Which leaves the state at a medical stand still: hence a desperate need for the Health-Care Plan to be revised. (Mary Carmichael, Newsweek)
  • The IPCC has admitted to giving out inaccurate information, especially regarding the melting of the Himalayan Mountains. Their predictions for 2035 have been off by 20 years (at least). The question lies at why errors were found in the configuration system of the Panel. Rajendra Pachauri, head of the IPCC, claims that the panel has been “too transparent with their work, using the [circling the jungle] system” rather than keeping their research on a low key. This has resulted in a 15% decrease of Global Warming Theory supporters, and has also reduced the credibility of the IPCC and UN organizations trying to combat gas emissions. (Newsweek, March 2010 edition)
  • Human Rights are becoming less significant on a global scale, not only because the American Democrats are acting in their own national interest, but also due to the fact that underdeveloped countries are lacking in advocacy. The minimal amount of advocacy they do currently posses, however, would have to represent their state in the presence of 15 separate judges from various geographical locations globally. However, the ICJ (International Court of Justice) takes a more conservative stand, acting in global benefit rather than national interest, thus if the fact that TWC (Third World Countries) are lacking in human rights doesn’t have a major affect on OECD countries, thus it is virtually impossible to take into account of each uprising fight for human rights. (International Relations: Key Concepts)
  • After China’s ban on freedom of voice and religion, China ranks second in having the least human rights recognition. The first is Kazakhstan. (Newsweek, March 2010 edition).
  • Australia is co-operating with the Sri Lanken government and limiting the amount of refugees entering the country. Reasons remain unclear, although speculations have been made that this is due to the possibility of Australia becoming uninhabitable in 20-50 years. If this were the case, a total evacuation of the country will have to be made, thus limiting the total influx of “less privileged people” will allegedly ease the evacuation in the years to come. (Theory still being revised).

Anyway, for those of you who faithfully follow my blog (I know there aren’t many yet), I hope this helped with a recent update. I should try to keep this going with more consistency, but due to the sudden inundation of information which I have been taking in recently, one can see why consistency might be a bit difficult at this time.

All the same, don’t stop reading!

Mikaela G.

Come on make a move on me.
~Joey Negro~